Mercy’s Embrace … and our Christmas eBook sale

‘Tis the season for reading.
And also for sweet eBook prices.

Here’s what we’re talking about …

 

Pamela Aidan’s much-loved Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman trilogy, and her Young Master Darcy have special Christmas pricing.

Susan Kaye’s wonderful Captain Wentworth novels, None But You and For You Alone, are also marked down.

Robin Helm, Laura Hile, and Barbara Cornthwaite (along with fellow author Wendi Sotis) have a new Christmas anthology, A Very Austen Christmas, and it is holding its own as a #1 Amazon Best Seller.

All of Robin Helm’s books — her Yours By Design series and  Guardian trilogy and her popular romance, Understanding Elizabeth —  are marked down to $1.99 each.

Barbara Cornthwaite’s delightful George Knightley, Esquire duo — Charity Envieth Not and Lend Me Leave — are on sale too.

George Knightley, Esquire-LendMeLeave

And so is Laura Hile’s Pride and Prejudice body-swap romance, Darcy By Any Other Name.

 

Finally, as if this were not enough Book Love, today Laura relaunches Mercy’s Embrace: So Rough A Course, the first volume of her Elizabeth Elliot series.

It’s a sparkling Regency romp in three parts, featuring all your favorites from Jane Austen’s Persuasion.

We are loving the new cover for this one.

Better stil, right now there is an eBook giveaway going on at Just Jane 1813Come read Claudine’s enthusiastic review, and leave a comment to enter.

Bring on the wintry weather, a bright fireside, and good reading, we say.

 

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It Could Get Cra-zy Up There

One of my favorite website is COLOSSAL. It’s about art, design, and just a lot of interesting stuff. I ran across something that should be of interest to many of us aging book types:

stairs-1

In Japan the houses are small, and the country being prone to earthquakes makes this slanted, climbable bookcase the center of the home. Even in a good shake, the books stay put.

I see problems.

I’m going to be 60 this year and I really don’t want to climb to the top of the bookcase to fetch my favorite copy of Little Women my husband gave me decades ago. My question would be, is Louisa May worth the risk of a broken hip? Put it on a lower shelf you say. That’s a great idea, but if you buy enough books, eventually, you’ll have to get off the ground.

Have someone else do it. Good, good. The problem is that someone else would wind up being a grandchild. Those of you who have had a climber know that this is a bad, bad example to set for them. We have a grandson who could go either way at this point so I know I don’t want to try and explain to him how shinnying up the bookcase to get Grandma’s pretty blue book is different from shinnying up there and swinging from shelf to shelf like a monkey. Or better yet, playing tag on the shelves with a like-minded friend.

Here’s another picture of the house with this bookcase:

stairs-6

The bookcase is not the only recreational feature of this house. I am guessing the lower room is the kitchen and the seating upstairs is for contemplation and work-from-home space. All I see is Olympic-level pancake flipping from the lower to the upper level. Or, shaking the soda bottle hard enough to see if you can hit a glass on the upper counter.

I’m sure there are a thousand and one more activities that could be devised with this configuration.

Maybe my family is out of whack, but I only see built-in challenges to kids and teens, and lots of visits to the emergency room with these features.

In reality, this is an interesting take on how architecture can evolve to meet challenges of the environment. Read about it HERE.

Attack of the Nekkid Guy, Part 2

Hide your children!

I received quite a shock last night, and I still ain’t over it.

I’d just returned home from helping to lead a Children’s Choir Christmas program followed by orchestra practice for our cantata at church.

My mind was filled with lovely, happy thoughts about Hallmark movies and puppies.

I stretched out on the couch in front of the TV, booted up my laptop, went to Amazon, and there it was! I covered up my eyes, but it was just too late.

I’d already been incensed – flashed right in front of my husband and everybody! That man on my screen wasn’t wearing nothin’ but a smile!

Don’t look, Ethel!

After fighting off one 99 cent nekkid guy about three weeks ago for best seller status, I saw a 99 cent nekkid SANTA had knocked A Very Austen Christmas down to second place.

Santa

And he’s headless! He’s a nekkid torso Santa! That’s just too scary for me. I’m near about sure he leads straight to a permanent place on the naughty list.

I’m gonna board up my chimney, lock my doors, and stay out of the malls. I don’t think nobody needs to see a nekkid, headless, torso Santa.

Darcy, Christmas, and first love… What could be better? A sale!

Young Master Darcy – Pamela Aidan

Are you looking for a lovely holiday gift for a Jane Austen fan?

The Kindle and print editions of Pamela Aidan’s charming novella, Young Master Darcy: A Lesson in Honour, now have special Christmas prices.

Kindle eBook: $4.99
Print book: $8.50

UPDATE: Simon & Schuster has reduced the price of the three-eBook set, Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman.

 

Check your favorite online bookstore!

Images are links to Amazon.

Book Description: It is Christmas, 1797, and thirteen year-old Master Fitzwilliam Darcy returns home from his first term at Eton in full anticipation of the holidays. Soon, he and his family will leave their fashionable London home for Pemberley, their Derbyshire estate, to prepare for the arrival of his irrepressible cousin Richard and the rest of his Matlock relations. But when Darcy arrives in London, he learns that his mother is ill. Her doctor’s prognosis is dire–Lady Anne cannot survive another year!

As Christmas approaches, Darcy is torn between his parents’ struggles to carry on and the attraction of an unusual company of players in Lambton for the holidays. With the arrival of Richard and his family, he must try to satisfy the expectations of all and, in doing so, learn what it means to be a Darcy.

Pamela Aidan has created a touching coming-of-age novella based on characters from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. A Lesson In Honour explores love, duty, and family honour.

Giveaways!

 

A Very Austen Christmas…

There are several giveaways still active for A Very Austen Christmas and even more coming in December.

A Very Austen Christmas - 3D

Serena at Savvy Verse & Wit posted a lovely book review with an excerpt from Laura’s story. The giveaway will end December 5.

Nissa, Of Pens and Pages, presented the backstory of my original character, Thomas, along with a wonderful review. Her giveaway ends  December 9.

On Laura Hartness’s blog, The Calico Critic, you’ll find an excerpt from my story, as well as a giveaway ending December 9.

Giveaways at Claudine’s JustJane1813, author Chautona Havig’s lovely blog, Ceri’s Babblings of a Bookworm, and Janet’s More Agreeably Engaged have already ended; however, there are author biographies, story blurbs, author interviews, story excerpts, and great reviews at those sites.

Upcoming giveaways, reviews, and other fun events are scheduled throughout December at Meredith’s Austenesque Reviews, Elisabeth’s Poolside Musings, Candy’s So Little Time, Anna’s Diary of an Eccentric, and Rita’s From Pemberley to Milton.

In other exciting news, Laura Hile is releasing the second edition of her Mercy’s Embrace books. Her book one, So Rough a Course, cover reveal  will be at JustJane 1813 on December 2. That’s tomorrow! Be sure to stop by and cheer her on.

You’re going to LOVE the new covers. I’ve seen them, and they are truly beautiful. I would love to post her new cover myself, but you’ll just have to wait until tomorrow. (Insert evil laugh.)

More to come, too! Watch for upcoming reviews, blog posts, and giveaways of So Rough A Course at Savvy Verse & Wit, Of Pens and Pages, and The Calico Critic.

Another bit of good news – Laura Hile, Wendi Sotis, Barbara Cornthwaite, and I have all lowered the prices of our other books throughout December. Merry Christmas!

The company we keep …

 

Photo Credit: Glyn Lowe Photoworks (Creative Commons Flickr)

I’m not a fan of name-droppers, no. Growing up, I was around plenty of them.

I was raised in the greater Los Angeles area; our semi-rural community was within easy commuting distance of “beautiful downtown Burbank.” Burbank is not glamorous, but it ought to be. Movie and television studios such as Disney, NBC, Worldwide Pictures, and Warner Bros. call Burbank home.

The reason I remember these is because we drove past them to get to my grandma’s. She lived in the Hollywood Hills above Cahuenga and Barham; her living room windows had a view of the famous hillside sign. Not that we cared. We thought that was normal.

What also was normal were the neighbors and friends’ parents who were employed by the studios. These professionals kept their heads down and worked. “Acting is a job, just like any other,” a dad I used to babysit for once told me. (Right there on his mantelpiece, two Emmy statues for sound editing.)

Ah, but their teenage offspring? They name-dropped. After a while, this became tiresome.

Well, now it is my turn. That’s right, I’m dropping some names!

Because Susan Kaye and I were mentioned in Janet Todd’s The Cambridge Introduction to Jane Austen. Seriously, we are in the same paragraph with one of our most favorite writers ever, P.D. James.

It’s our moment of semi-academic fame. Well, as fan fiction writers, anyway. We are smiling as we shake our heads. We are “ebullient and incorrigible spinners-off” of Austen’s novels, ha!

The moral of this story: googling your own name can unearth pleasant surprises. As well as the other kind …

Take a look! This screenshot is from a sample page from Google Books.

 

Beautiful like Lucifer

Michaelangelo’s David   (Photo Credit: Jay8085 — Creative Commons Flickr)

His was an impossibly beautiful face.

With golden hair, a manly chin, and ice-blue eyes, he was like a Greek god in the flesh.

A prince who stepped out of a storybook.

And he was altogether charming — oh, he was.

She too was lovely, and smart, and very talented. He singled her out to be his life’s companion, chosen over all others.

For she alone was worthy. Well, almost.

Was he the heaven-sent suitor she’d always dreamed of meeting?

Or was he beautiful like Lucifer, hell-bent on control and domination?

Memories are strange creatures. They can lie dormant for years, decades even. And then they burst forth like a bolt out of the blue: ferocious, painful, compelling.

Thus a gorgeous young man — vain and cunning to the core — stepped out of a writer’s past and onto the pages of her fiction.

Today Robin Helm discusses the real-life personality behind her character Thomas Jones. Yes, the “Golden Boy of Meryton” lived and breathed — and his sights were set on Robin. Elizabeth Bennet faces a similar predicament in “Her Christmas Gift,” Robin’s new novella featured in A Very Austen Christmas.

Read Robin’s guest post at Of Pens and Pages. And be reminded that Grandma was right. Handsome is as handsome does …

This article was also posted at Laura Hile: Faith, Hope, Laughter … and Happily Ever After