Say It With Dead Flowers?

Valentine’s Day is not only a holiday for those who are happily in love. The lovelorn, too, now can have their moment at the Museum of Broken Relationships which opened recently at the National Centre for Craft and Design in a small Lincolnshire town in the English countryside.

The creators of the concept, Croatian artists Olinka Vistica and Drazen Grubisic, created the exhibit as a coping mechanism for the ending of their own relationship.

Now, that’s interesting. What would one put in such a museum?

How about ripped-up loved letters, empty chocolate boxes, or a scratched CD of “our favorite song”? Should we include pictures of the couple ripped down the middle, a la “The Parent Trap,” along with a list of broken promises? In my garage, I have two expensive bridal portraits of my daughter, commemorating a marriage that never made it to the first anniversary. They would be perfect for such a museum. We gave her wedding dress and veil to “Dresses for Elyse,” a non-profit that gives bridal and prom wear to girls who cannot afford to buy outfits for themselves. I hope they have better luck with the dress than my daughter did. I would like for something good to come of it.

What would you put in such a museum?

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19 thoughts on “Say It With Dead Flowers?

  1. Laura Hile

    A museum of broken hearts. Much could be exhibited in such a place. The question is, who would visit this museum?

    Okay, so living in a family of men, I have no choice about some of the museums we visit. How about the National Atomic Museum in New Mexico? Have any of you been to this place? Talk about a downer!

    My dad was an aerospace engineer, so I grew up with defense industry talk, identifying military aircraft flying overhead, etc. Even so, I was surprised at my emotional reaction to seeing room after room of bomb paraphernalia. I crept through that place. It’s since been renamed. The National Museum of Nuclear Science & History

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  2. Gayle Mills

    How about the empty prescription bottles that were filled with Paxil or Prozac? Maybe a copy of the lawyer’s bill? A copy of the divorce decree that promised me child support I never got? Perhaps pictures of my daughter standing at the window crying as she waited for her dad to come to the school’s Thanksgiving dinner for parents? Pictures of him at the slopes instead with the new wife-to-be? Statements from the marriage counselor?

    It really doesn’t matter what’s in the museum. It’s what’s embedded in your memories that you have to make peace with.

    How do you put perspective in a museum?

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    1. Laura Hile

      Oh, Gayle.

      There’s no way to exhibit emotional devastation. Or the anger mixed with sorrow that come from betrayal and abandonment. It’s bad enough that you must suffer at the hands of a selfish pig former husband, but to see your children suffer as well …

      The best “museum” for this sort of thing is a novel, my girl.

      We’re here when you’re ready to write it.

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    2. Robin Helm

      I prefer a sculpture of the plates of spaghetti you dumped on him and his mistress, or maybe a bust depicting his facial expression at that moment. I would also like a picture of his face when Larry told him that we had mentioned him in our wills – he was to inherit everything in case of the rapture.

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  3. Robin Helm

    He was her husband at the time, and he’s lucky that all she did was to dump spaghetti on him. Mr. Bobbitt would have been happy to have gotten off that easily.

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  4. Gayle Mills

    Actually it was chips and dip. They were having margaritas at the time. After dumping the drinks, I thought they needed the food. I really do need to tell that story one of these days.

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  5. Gayle Mills

    I feel that we’ve been friends a long time, Laura. I caught up on your WIP tonight. I loved the scene with Ronan and the Contessa. They have more than met their match in Elizabeth. And Cleora and the music master… surely not. My only disappointment is the lack of Patrick McGillvary thus far. Elizabeth as Cleora’s mother? That will be interesting.

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  6. Sophia Rose

    For real? I swear there is a museum for everything. I guess I would have to toss in my journal since I wouldn’t want to remember that time anyway. I’m too practical to deep six the jewelry.

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    1. Laura Hile

      Sophia, girl, do you write? Have you ever thought about writing?

      Look, if you can recognize good writing, that’s a big flag that maybe you can. And should try.

      That journal — with names nicely sanitized — is a gold mine for stories! If not plot ideas, the heroine’s emotional responses to events would be spot-on 🙂

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  7. Susan Kaye

    I’m thinking a copy of the restraining order. And all the credit card receipts for clothes, cell phones, and sporting equipment. Each came with the statement, “I’ll pay you back.”

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    1. Laura Hile

      The classic William Elliot line, given to his soon-to-be-ruined pal, Mr Smith.

      I knew someone who schmoozed her way across Europe with my mom and uncle in the days before ATM cards. “I don’t have cash, and I can’t get to the bank. And I left my credit card in the hotel safe. Can I pay you back?”

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  8. Susan Kaye

    Actually, Robin, I am the product of marrying young. I didn’t have a lot of guys in my life before Bill so have not been worked over romantically. I watch Judge Judy occasionally so know that this sort of stuff happens with great regularity. I did have on boyfriend morph into a stalker but that was prerestraining order days, and was of short duration. My grandfather talked to his father and voila! no more stalker. Ah, the good old days.

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  9. Robin Helm Post author

    My dad talked to my first boyfriend while cleaning his gun. Freaked the poor guy right out, but he behaved himself.

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Why yes, we DO want a piece of your mind. ;-)

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