Facing Fear

Do you ever feel like this is what you’re doing ALL the time? I do, and I’m afraid of heights.

Do you balance a hundred things at a time and walk carefully to avoid falling on your face? How do you face your fears?

This is Nick Wallenda, who successfully walked on a two-inch wide tightrope 1800 feet across Niagara Falls Friday night. I could throw up just thinking about it. He already has plans to do the same over the Grand Canyon.

I doubt that Mr. Wallenda is afraid of heights since he’s been doing stunts such as this all his life. He was born into The Flying Wallendas.

Yesterday, I was talking to a young man who routinely plays ball in front of 80,000 fans as well as a huge television audience. I asked him how he handles the pressure. He said that it’s no different than what I do: writing books or playing an instrument before a concert crowd.

Maybe it’s really more about what we’re afraid of. I hyperventilate thinking about tightrope walking or playing sports in front of crowds of people. He thinks writing or performing in an orchestra is scary, but he’s at home with anything athletic. Before I started writing, the very idea was paralyzing. Now, I don’t think about it. Concerts still frighten me, but I do them anyway, because I love it once the music starts. He doesn’t think about being injured; he just enjoys playing.

Maybe as long as we’re engaged in something that we love doing, we don’t worry about the fear. What do you fear? What do you enjoy? Have you ever given up something you love because of fear?

Advertisements

17 thoughts on “Facing Fear

  1. Gayle Mills

    When I was younger, most of my fears were associated with my children. I was afraid for them most of the time. They, ironically enough, were fearless. I still have visions of being on a ski lift and realizing as I looked down that I was watching my 6 year old daughter flying down the trail below me.

    So now I’m scared for my grandkids. I’m afraid that Seth will have an accident now that he has a driver’s license. I’m afraid that some nutcase out there will hurt Jacob or Eli, or Sara or Hannah.

    But the older I get, the less afraid I am for myself. I’ve adopted more of the John Fox philosophy: “It is what it is.” And I’m reminded that this place is not my home. So if I leave this life a little sooner than I had planned, it’s all right with me.

    Like

    Reply
  2. Robin Helm

    Lovely sentiments, Sis, and I completely understand. I worry more about Mandy and Melly than I do about what might happen to me. I’ll be happier when they are both back in this country, and I know that they’re healthy.

    Like

    Reply
  3. Laura Hile

    It’s summer, which means that five days a week I’m cranking out 1500 words a day. And at the same time, I’m facing fear.

    It’s hard. Writing is a solitary undertaking, and I must drive myself to produce. Then too, it’s scary to create a story and know that it’s the best I can do.

    What if I run out of ideas?
    What if I write myself into a corner?
    What if the book turns out to be … boring? Or (even worse) stupid?

    I could quit.

    Or I could show up and get started. Every day, consistently.

    When Monday comes, I will remember the image of Nick Wallenda on that tightrope, Robin. One careful step at a time, without looking down, he accomplished his journey. He didn’t run across or do fancy tricks. No, his focus was to take each step. In so doing, he braved the distance, the wind and the spray from the falls, the churning water beneath. But in the end, he gained a reward: the thrill of accomplishment.

    If I quit, there will be no rejoicing because there will be no victory.

    (But I will have to face Robin and Gayle and the angry mob they’ll assemble to come after me!)

    So, onward!. 🙂

    Like

    Reply
    1. Robin Helm

      You took my theme of facing fear and did it one better. Take one step at a time, and just keep going.

      Gayle and I are known for our angry mobstering. We grew up in the sticks in the South, so far out in the coun’ry they had to pipe sunlight in. Don’t make us have to come over there.

      Like

      Reply
  4. Annette Wristen

    You want to know about fear, talk to me.
    As a child, I was afraid if a man knocked at the door, the deep end (3 ft.) at the pool, the dark, holes in the wall, letting anything other than my nose stick out from under the covers at night, thunder, umbrellas on windy days, windy days, 18 wheelers, airplanes, tall buildings, the dentist, big snakes, big ships, bridges… the list goes on. Some were valid fears, others were simply a product of my wild imagination.
    I can handle 5 ft. at the pool now, men are not the enemy and I carry a flashlight. I still find myself holding my breath and cringing while I am passing a semi on the highway. If you ask me to come visit you, I will calculate the mileage and number of days it will take to get there. I have learned to like my dentist, but he had to replace the arms on his chairs before I got to that point. I no longer hide under tables when I see lightning and rather than allow a fear to overtake me, I will deal with it.
    BUT, I repeat
    BUT,
    I do not do crazy things like pull over to take pictures of three big grizzlies coming out of hibernation, or crossing Niagra on a tightrope.

    Like

    Reply
    1. Robin Helm

      I love getting to know you, Annette. You are always full of surprises. I would never have pegged you as a ‘fraidy cat.

      As a child, I washed my hands all the time (because my older siblings told me that I had ancestors and garments all over me). I, too, was afraid of the dark, and the theme music of “The Twilight Zone” or “The Outer Limits” sent me scurrying under the bed. I couldn’t look at pictures of snakes in books without freaking out.

      I’ve overcome all that, but I still have a fear of heights. There is a bridge on I-485 in Charlotte that terrifies me. I plan any trips to avoid that bridge, and if I had a job on the other side of it, I would have to move.

      Like

      Reply
  5. Winstrol 2 mg

    I admit, I have not been on crownhillwriters.wordpress.com in a long time however it was another joy to see It is such an important topic and ignored by so many, even professionals. I thank you to help making people more aware of possible issues.

    Like

    Reply
    1. Robin Helm

      Welcome back! I hope that we will address many important topics of interest to you. We are an eclectic bunch, and I will freely admit that my posts swing from humor to “deep stuff” often.

      Like

      Reply
  6. Ellen

    Did anyone notice that Nick Wallenda was praying audibly almost the whole time he was crossing? In the moments between the commentary, you could hear it. He was praising God over and over with phrases from the Psalms.

    And Laura, I am thrilled that you are writing again! If I could pull the story out of your head, I would; I just have to know what happens next. It is amazing to me that such brilliant stories are actually made up. They seem so perfect on the page. I can’t imagine Elizabeth Elliot any other way now, except as the person you created. Even when I reread Persuasion, I seem to have a secret connection with Elizabeth, thinking, “I know who you really are. Even your creator probably had bigger plans for you. It just took about 200 more years for the rest of us to know you.” Please be encouraged and keep writing!

    Like

    Reply
    1. Robin Helm

      I had not noticed that, Ellen. Thanks for bringing it to our attention! That’s wonderful!

      I am also thrilled that Laura is writing again, and that she’s going to add two more books to the series! It’s difficult to wait, but masterpieces take time. Even so, the rest of us will keep prodding her. Ha!

      Like

      Reply
    2. Laura Hile

      Ellen and Robin, thanks for the votes of confidence.

      I spent the morning helping at our church day camp … with twenty almost-first-grade girls. To a mother of boys, young ladies are a mystery and a relational surprise. Today one girl had a fabric flower detach from her t-shirt. Oh, the concern on her little face! In a flash of God-given insight—boys wouldn’t notice or even care—I recognized how much this loss troubled her. Because I teach at the school here, I was able to access my classroom and the supply of safety pins in my desk. She was adorably relieved.

      So…I’m taking a break for lunch before facing that daunting blank screen on my laptop…and the 1500 word daily quota. I’m out of ideas (and energy!), so I’m sending Charles Musgrove to center stage. He’s always up to something. Today he’s setting up an office in an unused tack room at Uppercross—for his horse breeding business he hopes to launch—and thinks it’s important to have a map of Wales on the wall. He’s feeling safe, for who would remember that the surname Owen is Welsh? And although he’ll never see her again, it comforts him to find her village on the map.

      Poor Charles. The way of honor is hard.

      Like

      Reply
      1. Robin Helm

        The way of Mary is hard. Poor Charles!

        You’re used to boys, and I’m used to girls. My girls have never been big eaters, and neither is my husband. I hope I don’t starve the young man visiting our house quite often lately. He’s a keeper. I’d hate to chase him away. ; )

        Like

        Reply
        1. Laura Hile

          Robin, remember the old saw about the path to a man’s heart?

          I might have mentioned this before, but when my two eldest sons were, I think, six and eight we attended the gala family Thanksgiving—our family reunions were held in five-star resorts (I am very definitely the poor cousin in the tribe of achievers!). Michael and Nathan gazed at the buffet table, overseen by chefs wielding carving knives, with solemn amazement. “Mom,” Michael said, with unconcealed awe “look. MEAT.”

          Not much has changed! 🙂

          Throw an extra chicken breast in the oven and serve it up on his plate. (He’s the athlete, right?) He’ll rejoice!

          Like

          Reply
          1. Robin Helm

            Actually, I had a brain storm Friday. I cooked my Mama’s country style steak with gravy, and I made homemade mashed potatoes with a squash casserole. Add in the biscuits and brownies, and I think it was a hit. I also made him a gallon of sweet tea. Turns out he’s addicted to the stuff.

            I just have to think on a larger scale when he’s around.

            Like

            Reply

Why yes, we DO want a piece of your mind. ;-)

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s