may the odds be ever in your favor …

!More Questions!

How uncomfortable were you reading about the Capitol’s obsession with the games and the Tributes? It read like a parody of the West’s obsession with reality shows and those participating in them. The irony of the lavish food, clothing, and interviews being as much a part of the show as training the Tributes to kill, the Avoxes,Β  and all the technology in place to keep them from jumping off buildings was interesting.

I also wondered if there were Hunger Games South America, Africa, or Asia like there is America’s Next Top Model, or American Idol.

How, she wondered, did Cinna came to be comparatively normal being a stylist in the Capitol.

Big, big, big, big day! in the words of Effie Trinket, the escort of the tributes of District 12. Effie knows the ropes, but we of JSI are going down uncharted territory as we’ve never done a group read. I’ll throw out some questions and I’m sure the others will chime in with clever insights and sharp wit.

CHARACTERS

Off the top of my head, looking at Katniss’s circumstances, which Austen heroine does she most resemble?

Same question about Gale and Peeta. No, you know I meant which hero(es) do they resemble. Sheesh, this is going to rough. πŸ˜‰

CULTURE

Katniss called the place, “the artificial candy capitol.” And it seems to be, but the affected ways of the people seem to closely mirror our own Hollywood. And the affected speech of the prep team is a lot like the Devonshire Drawl, a slanguage of the Cavendish clan in Georgian England.

Everything new has a past.

CRAFT

I am enjoying the way that Suzanne Collins really knows how to realistically up the ante when it comes to her plot. Each step in the story raises the stakes for particularly Katniss and Peeta, but the other Tributes as well.

If you’re a writer, you know this isn’t always so easy.

So, take your pick and comment on all aspects of just one. We will be in and out all day commenting as well. Scroll down for other new posts.

Take care–Susan Kaye

Advertisements

24 thoughts on “may the odds be ever in your favor …

  1. Susan Kaye Post author

    Okay, I know it’s Monday and everyone’s a bit bleary-eyed. So, I’ll go first.

    Characters: I think that Katniss could Elinor Dashwood. She’s still young herself but has to take charge of an emotionally frail mother and a younger sister. Prim and Marianne aren’t alike but still require a someone to step up. Anne Elliot is also temperamentally like Katniss. She’s quiet and goes about doing what’s necessary to survive.

    Still no clue about heroes.

    Culture: The culture is very much like any culture where sophistication is prized over all else. The petty and banal become vital. Sir Walter could have maneuvered in the Capitol with ease and enjoyed it a great deal.

    Craft: I’m not a big fan of first person present but it works her to keep the tension up. Collins uses short sentences to keep Katniss’s thoughts flowing in a realistic but readable flow.

    Join in any time.

    Like

    Reply
    1. Laura Hile

      This year I had students writing in the first person present for the first time. Was it the influence of Hunger Games? Perhaps, but I think this style is gaining popularity in sci-fi as well.

      Like

      Reply
          1. Susan Kaye Post author

            Chick Lit was a big influence as well. In most cases I think it’s a me, me, me sort of thing, but in this case and other adventuresome works I think it adds to the tension.

            Like

            Reply
            1. Laura Hile

              I agree. If there’s enough going on, I am consumed with the story and don’t notice the present tense. Plus, a good writer can get away with things that others can’t.

              Like

          2. Robin Helm

            I was not impressed with the writing style employed in The Hunger Games. I did not think it was as well-written as The Twilight Saga. I’m not a fan of sentence fragments used in narrative. Not. At. All.

            Like

            Reply
            1. Susan Kaye Post author

              I don’t mind fragments if they are done realistically. I dislike most Chick Lit because they are/were done with all the grace of rapid-fire comedians who don’t even wait for the rimshot. this sort of dialog is like champaign, not too much too often or it ceases to be of value.

              Like

    2. Laura Hile

      Oh, see great minds think alike! I didn’t see your comment about Anne Elliot until now. Sir Walter as one of the stylists? Oh, surely. He’d be one of the America’s Next Top Model panelists … if it didn’t have ‘America’ in the title!

      Like

      Reply
  2. Robin Helm

    Gale seems to be a sort of Colonel Fitzwilliam or Captain Wentworth to me, but that’s probably because I’ve read all three books. I suppose I must limit myself to the chapters we’ve just read? I would have to refer to all three books to justify my ideas concerning Gale. Peeta most resembles Charles Bingley (likeable and friendly) with a hint of Darcy (protective, loyal, and intelligent).

    I can see Katniss as Elinor. She isn’t ugly, but she isn’t beautiful, either. She’s also very much a “take charge” type of girl. She’s very independent, and she will sacrifice herself for those she loves. Prim would fit Kitty Bennet without the influence of Lydia. I also see shades of Catherine Moreland in Prim.

    Like

    Reply
  3. Laura Hile

    For this group read, I’m taking myself in hand about not reading ahead. I’ve read only the assigned portion—so wonderful to read for pure pleasure, especially on such a lovely summer’s morning. The windows are open, I can hear birds and see the sunshine …

    Characters: Katniss could very well be an Elinor.

    But group reads cannot be about agreement. right? So … I’m wondering if Katniss could also be an Anne Elliot? Okay, Anne would never wield a weapon or coolly hunt an animal! But we see her step up when she must — closing Kellynch Hall when her father and sister flit away to Bath, with all the wearing duties of leave-taking. And though she never faced the starvation Katniss lived with, Anne makes a financial plan for her father that is both drastic and painfully severe. Anne is also an observer, keeping to herself, reluctant to confide her opinions. We see Katniss harden herself, just like Anne does, not wishing to cry, carefully schooling her countenance …

    Peeta resembles Charles Musgrove (as I write him). Likable, self-effacing, with more skills and strengths than he realizes.

    Like

    Reply
  4. Susan Kaye Post author

    Austen being a more gentrified writer doesn’t present us with characters that will transfer to Panem easily. But, I think I agree somewhat with Robin about Peeta being like Wentworth, except that Peeta is a wild card and we will have to see if he has the leadership qualities of the captain.

    Like

    Reply
  5. Catherine DePasquale

    I am reading along with you. I don’t have a lot to comment on. I am kind of tip toeing around so I don’t read any spoilers. This is my first time reading The Hunger Games, and I liked it immediately (to my surprise). I agree with the similarities between Katniss and Elinor. Does anyone see a resemblance to Fanny, with the dismal home life that Katniss has? I cannot comment on Peeta or Gale yet. I don’t feel I know them well enough to comment.

    Like

    Reply
  6. Susan Kaye Post author

    Hey, Catherine, welcome. We’ll try not to blow the whole book for you.

    Certainly Fanny and Katniss have the dismal family life. But the difference of dead father vs. drunken father makes a difference in some ways. And Fanny can’t rescue herself whereas Katniss does by hunting.

    In THG, Gale is mentioned more than seen, but by the end you’ll have a feeling for Peeta. Or will you?

    Thanks again for joining us.

    Like

    Reply
    1. Robin Helm

      I was wary of Peeta at first, and I favored Gale. As the story continued, my loyalties switched. Peeta is the most loveable character in the story, hands down.

      Like

      Reply
  7. Susan Kaye Post author

    I like Peeta, he’s an open character. But, the character of Gale plays an important role in the whole of the trilogy. You can’t see it yet so just hang in.

    Like

    Reply
    1. Robin Helm

      I agree. Gale is central to the plot. I was just a little disappointed with the wrap-up of the story in the third book.

      Like

      Reply
      1. Susan Kaye Post author

        I saw a lot of Writer’s Fatigue in the third volume. While you’d think action is action and since she handled action well in the first volumes, she’d do the same in the last, the emotional pitch of the resolution had to be different in no. 3. The craft of writing a series is not just the sum of novel writing, it’s a subject all its own.

        Like

        Reply
      2. Laura Hile

        I learned first-hand how difficult it is to write an ending to a series. Such a shocking, unexpected truth to encounter. And writer’s fatigue? Know about that one, yes. How many well-known writers came to loathe their famous hero? (Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie …)

        I’m a long way from the end in this series!

        Like

        Reply
    1. Laura Hile

      I know what you mean, Catherine. Man vs Books Club is running a review of The Hunger Games right now. And I had to click away from the page!

      We’ll be posting other articles during the group read. They’ll appear just under this one. πŸ™‚

      Like

      Reply
  8. Robin Helm

    Sorry, Catherine. I didn’t mean to let any cats out of the bag. I’ll try to do better in the future. ; )

    Like

    Reply

Why yes, we DO want a piece of your mind. ;-)

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s