Something to think about

From the ABA  Journal (Law News Now): Reclusive fan wills estate worth up to $1 million to two ‘80s-era actors he never met

A reclusive man who lived in a central Illinois farmhouse without running water and drove a Ford truck from the 1960s nonetheless had an estate worth up to $1 million when he died last year.

And 71-year-old Ray Fulk, who never married and had no children or close family members, did not die intestate. He willed the bulk of his estate to two actors he never met who were TV and movie stars in the 1980s and 1990s, the State Journal-Register reports. The Anti-Cruelty Society in Chicago got $5,000.

In his will, which was drawn up by Behle, Ray calls Brophy and Barton his friends. The lawyer says he found some letters written by his clients to the two actors. “They sent back responses that basically said thanks for writing and please watch me in whatever their next movie or show was.”

Read the comments, some are profane but most are very thoughtful.

Take care–Susan Kaye

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15 thoughts on “Something to think about

  1. Wendi Sotis

    He obviously had at least a few toes in reality if he called them by name and not by their character names. If he had nobody else, why not a couple of actors who, by watching their performances, made his days brighter, so he considered them his friends? Maybe he just wanted someone to remember him and figured their relatives would, even if it was just a story about some crazy guy who left them his money?

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    1. Susan Kaye Post author

      I agree the man wasn’t completely out of touch. Not having any face-to-face relationships changes a human being. A person would become more dependent on their imagination to satisfy that inbred desire for contact. That’s to me the sad part of this. I think he was kind and generous to leave his money to these men. In the same way he left money to care for animals.

      What’s sad to me is that he obviously built castles in the air when his fan letters were answered with boilerplate answers from the studio publicity machine.

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  2. Gayle Mills

    You mean this isn’t normal? Gee, I was planning to leave all my stuff to Al Gore because, after all, he invented the internet, and some of my best, closest personal relationships are happening online these days.

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    1. Laura Hile

      All your “stuff”? 😀

      You aren’t a secret hoarder, are you, Gayle? (No? Too bad.) Because a house filled with old magazines, empty oleo tubs, diet Pepsi cans, and stacks of stolen library books—and cats, lots and lots of cats! —might be just the “prize” to show your Internet gratitude
      .

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      1. Gayle Mills

        No, Laura, I don’t have those things that normal people hoard. I keep magazines for that “one” special article. I keep boxes of music because I might have someone call for that particular piece. I have everything I need in my closet to be well dressed from a size 16 to 3X. There are dozens of books I definitely will read — when I have time. And now I’ve found a compact way to add to this obsession — KindleFire. I even have shelves of knickknacks I brought home from my mother’s — some that I didn’t even like when she was living, but all of which I must keep now that’s she’s gone.

        On second thought, as big as Al has gotten, he might need the 3X’s soon.

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          1. Gayle Mills

            He had better hurry. I may start selling off “stuff” to pay Obama’s new taxes. My checks are down $140 a month, and that’s with my salary for 190 days of teaching being spread out over 24 paychecks. I hate to think what I am really losing per day.

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  3. Susan Kaye Post author

    You are free to do as you like, Gayle. I figure that politicians. as a class, and the gov’t in general, will be prying money out of my cold dead fingers. I refuse to make it easy for them.

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  4. Robin Helm

    I don’t understand why people want the autographs of famous people, and I certainly won’t leave my hard-earned money to them. In fact, most actors and actresses are off my list to pay to see their work.

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    1. Susan Kaye Post author

      Depending on the project, I can stomach paying–especially when I know they may be getting only pennies from my renting a DVD, and yes, pennies do add up–but there are a few who gent none of my cold, hard cash. Or plastic.

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Why yes, we DO want a piece of your mind. ;-)

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