We decided to see it …

My husband and I had no intentions of going to the movies on Valentine’s Day. There has been so much hoopla about 50 Shades of Grey we didn’t want to get caught up in it. But, we went to an out of the way theatre we like. And though we were late we got great seats.

The opening was engaging and pulled you in. Even though the characters are somewhat stereotypical, they had some unique quirks that made you want to follow them.

The story is really about testing the limits of endurance, of the characters and the audience at times. There is definite physical violence but most of it is psychological and emotional to be honest. It is a movie that makes you question yourself and what you might do if placed in the same circumstances.

We went to see American Sniper two weeks ago and there were scenes that made me want to leave the theatre. I’m proud to say I hung in then, and I think it was apt preparation for this movie.

Many of the scenes are over-the-top, not very plausible, and out-and-out silly. But, with this sort of material the film needs that self-awareness and camp to keep from exhausting the viewer.

I do have to say that one scene was particularly sad, and a little disturbing. When Samuel L. Jackson shoots Colin “Darcy” Firth in the forehead and he falls to the ground in front of the church, I was pretty stunned. Firth’s character was the glue that held the plot together to that point. Fortunately, Mark “Knightley” Strong’s character, Merlin, stepped up and took over this funny and excessive spy thriller.

KingsmenKingsmen, The Secret Service is violent, funny, tongue-in-cheek, and vulgar in funny and tasteless ways. Considering Hollywood has been trapped in a Jr High locker room for decades, what else can we expect? Millions of heads explode on screen to the 1812 Overture, the villain dies by artificial limb, and the young hero saves his mum from a scummy boyfriend. The clothes are great as well.

I can’t recommend this movie to most of the people I know, but if you don’t mind frat boy humor with a British accent, Kingsmen may be for you.

12 thoughts on “We decided to see it …

  1. Robin Helm

    I have looked more into the plot of 50 Shades, and there is much more there than BDSM. Grey was horrifically abused as a very young child, he was often hungry, he was mistreated by his mother’s johns, he spent four days locked in an apartment with her after she died of a crack overdose when he was four years old, and he was victimized by a pedophile from the time he was 15 until he was 21. She took him into BDSM. He wasn’t a monster, though he thought he was.

    The story traces his way out of that lifestyle and self-hatred. It’s also important to note that he never did anything to anyone without their full knowledge and consent, and that they were all adults.

    When a book sells 100 million copies, I want to know why. It can’t be just because it’s erotica. There’s an overload of that genre out there (including within JAFF circles).

    Let me be very clear that I’m not recommending this book. I am saying that the hysteria over the book has helped to sell it.

    Any post slamming 50 Shades on Facebook receives a multitude of “likes” and comments. I put up a post about 21 Christians being beheaded yesterday, and only four or five people “liked” it. Only one commented. What should we be more concerned about? Another sexy book, or Christians being slaughtered?

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  2. Nicole

    So, you didn’t say what movie you went to see until the end, and so I assumed your synopsis was about that other movie that came out this past weekend, and not Kingsmen, which I actually wanted to see, but you’ve now spoiled the ending for me. I wouldn’t have read this review if I’d know what movie you were talking about.

    Excellent. Thanks.

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    1. Susan Kaye Post author

      I was about to run up and put a big old SPOILER ALERT on the top of this post so that everyone will know that this post tells some things about the movie, Kingsmen. But now, NO. If this one, little-visited site on a backwater of the web is all it took to keep one person from going to see a film, grow up people. It’s not like I told you how The Mousetrap ends. I’m not Gene Siskel who told the big denouement of Blue Velvet.

      Kingsmen is a B grade flick that is funny and a great respite from the horror of American Sniper, the PC seriousness and character-O-meter of the latest “must-see,” the pretension of whatever art film is making the rounds now, or the claptrap of 50 Shades.

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  3. Nicole

    Screaming SPOILER ALERT is never necessary. Just making sure your readers know what movie you are talking about from the beginning would help. I’m obviously not the only reader who assumed you were talking about 50 Shades, as the other comment would show. At first, I actually thought you’d written two separate movie reviews and accidentally posted them as one, especially when you talked about the temptation to walk out during the film and mentioned a third film as an example.

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    1. Susan Kaye Post author

      Again, sorry Nicole, but I am just so tired of me being made responsible for everyone else’s disappointments in life. It’s been a helluva week and it’s only Thursday.

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  4. Nicole

    Wow, that escalated quickly.

    I didn’t realize that honestly commenting on this post would turn you in to a 7 year old child. I never said I wasn’t going to go see the film, just that you’d spoiled the ending for me. I can just stop visiting this site, which I do quite often and keep up with it in my feed reader, if I’m unable to comment at all without being subjected to hateful comments for simply being confused by the way this post was written.

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  5. Nicole

    You know what’s funny, I always think that I want to get more involved in the world of Jane Austen fan fiction. I love reading it, and most of the writers have proven to be very nice, and humble. Abigail Reynolds has always been very kind when I’ve had any contact with her. I wrote one of my final grad papers over Austen fan fiction, and the effect of her works on our modern society. I’ve even toyed with the idea of writing my own Austen fan fiction piece.

    And then I make a comment on a blog of authors I follow and whose books I’m planning to purchase someday, and am told that one of the authors is tired of “being made responsible for everyone else’s disappointments in life.”

    Let me assure you, this movie spoiler hasn’t ruined my life, nor has it produced the tears I’ve cried over much more serious issues and disappointments in recent years. In fact, it hasn’t even ruined my morning.

    What it has done, however, and more specifically, what your childish fit over my comments has done, is that it has made me decide not to purchase your book. If you can’t take a little criticism over a blog post, I can only imagine what you would say to the innocent reviewer who dared to dislike your “great” novel.

    Apparently, unlike the line above the comment box, you DON’T want a piece of my mind.

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    1. Susan Kaye Post author

      Nicole, you’re right, my inner seven-year old jumped to the fore quickly today. I’m sorry for that. As for Jane Austen, she would never have liked me. I am not quick and clever as Lizzie Bennet. I’m not really one of the Austen girls. I’m not even one of the Austen boys, they are far more gentlemenly. The only thing I am is sorry I snapped at you.

      Please accept my apology, Nicole.

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      1. Nicole

        Of course. We all have days like that. I have more than my share, I’m afraid. I apologize, also, if anything I said was hurtful or short tempered.

        And just between you and me, I don’t think Jane would have liked me either. I’m a lot less Lizzie and a lot more Emma. It probably explains why Emma is one of my least favorite heroines. She’s too much like me for me to truly appreciate her.

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        1. Laura Hile

          Nicole, thank you for stopping by and joining the discussion. I’m sorry things escalated like they did.

          How I wish I were Lizzy or even Emma! I share WAY too much in common with whiny Mary Musgrove. Not the FOMO thing (Fear Of Missing Out, according to my sons) but the Poor Me thing. Trust Jane to nail it. 🙂

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        2. Susan Kaye Post author

          Thank you for your grace, Nicole. My ties with Jane are tenuous at best. Obviously, my ties with humanity are dangling by a thread.

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Why yes, we DO want a piece of your mind. ;-)

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