Worth the work and bother

Photo: Dan Queiroz (Creative Commons Flickr)

Photo: Dan Queiroz (Creative Commons Flickr)

A summertime beer commercial came on the other night. You know the one, with the lemon wedge in the bottle? And my husband gave a long sigh. He’s been working six days a week and would dearly love to visit the coast.

Such a winsome image, those beautiful beach people. Gathered around a fire at sunset, lifting their glasses bottles to the good life. No work and all joy.

In some ways, it’s better than being there. We don’t see the flies, or the wind, or the people that hauled the wood and ice chests. Or the cleaning up. A production crew took care of those things, spending the day (or several) to film that short clip. The end product was worth the work and bother.

I knew then that we needed to schedule a beach trip. We’ll do swatting work, and the hauling work, and the cleaning up after too. Not as beautifully (or as effortlessly) as the images on television, but worth it. Because when you live it, when the experience is real, there is satisfaction. (Okay, unless it rains. This is Oregon.)

Effort is no bad thing, I remind myself. There’s much work, seen by no one, to make a lovely finished book. I can sigh and roll my eyes and lament about how much I have to do. Or I can tell myself that this book is definitely worth the work and bother.

I’m liking this reminder from Debbie Ridpath Ohi. Work is not my enemy and my goodness, I even have readers waiting to buy. I am absolutely luckier than I think. Besides, there are always things to fret about, no matter how successful you are.

Used with permission from Debbie Ridpath Ohi at Inkygirl.com. Image is link.

Used with permission from Debbie Ridpath Ohi at Inkygirl.com. Image is link.

6 thoughts on “Worth the work and bother

  1. Gayle Mills

    “In some ways, it’s better than being there.” I had to laugh. This is so true. They don’t show you the traffic or the lines at restaurants or the blanket to blanket covering of the beach. They don’t let you hear the drunks by the pool at 3 AM or the teenagers shooting off fireworks. Nope. In the ads, it’s always perfect.🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. Laura Hile

      I grew up in the greater Los Angeles area (in the foothills of Angeles National Forest, semi-rural but it was incorporated into Los Angeles all the same), and Santa Monica was our closest beach. Oh, it could get very crowded there, as you describe.

      My parents live an hour north of Santa Monica (above Malibu, even) in Ventura. Much less crowded. But our beaches here in Oregon (1000 miles even farther north) are gloriously deserted. They’re walking beaches most of the year, with people wearing hoodies instead of bikinis.

      Commercials portray an ideal that is just as much fantasy as Disneyland. So do finished books … and smoothly-running fiction forums, right? The amount of work you put into getting Beyond Austen up and running most people never think about.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply

Why yes, we DO want a piece of your mind. ;-)

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