Welcome to Wentworth Wednesday

Throwback Thursday is defined by Know Your Meme© as: “… an Internet theme day observed on every Thursday during which people share an old photograph of themselves via social networking sites and image-sharing communities, most notably through photo-sharing mobile app Instagram.

In my case I’ve only used it a couple of times and that was to put up embarrassingly old photos of other people. Anyway, I thought it would be good to play around with a new theme I’m — as you see above — calling, Wentworth Wednesday.

This will be a limited run meme of quoted text either about or by Frederick Wentworth from each of the 24 chapters of Jane Austen’s Persuasion. There is no limit on length of quotes, and I make no guarantees about the how harsh or kind I may be with my own comments. I really make no promises about the comments of others. The Best Boyfriend realm of the Austenverse is a tough place and that “Henry Tilney Forever” crowd can be brutal on the older guys. On top of that, each Austen hero comes preloaded with greatness and glitches aplenty on which to feast. And we fans do plenty of it.

I will also post a screen cap from the 1995 version of Persuasion starring Amanda Root and Ciaran Hinds. I hear there are other versions with other men portraying Wentworth. Here in SUSAN KAYE’S CORNER OF THE VERSE that is only a rumor and until I get confirmation, I’m sticking with the classic.

One of the pleasure of declaring your own meme is that you get to put things together the way you like best, and Jane said we all like that. Unfortunately, Jane didn’t cooperate with my meme as she didn’t even give Frederick a mention until Chapter 3. And even Chapter 3’s mention comes in the last sentence and is ambiguous at best. Ah, the life of a pioneer.

So, here we go with the first Wentworth Wednesday:

Chapter 3, Persuasion
“Mr Shepherd was completely empowered to act; and no sooner had such an end been reached, than Anne, who had been a most attentive listener to the whole, left the room, to seek the comfort of cool air for her flushed cheeks; and as she walked along a favourite grove, said, with a gentle sigh, ‘A few months more, and he, perhaps, may be walking here.'”

Persuasion_609

It’s not a grove at Kellynch but we have a long way to go and this may keep us in hope.

 

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12 thoughts on “Welcome to Wentworth Wednesday

    1. Susan Kaye Post author

      Welcome fellow Fangirl! I have tried to move on from Frederick, giving others of the Heroes a try, but I always come back to the Captain.

      Please follow along and feel free to comment on your favorite quotes and texts as we go through the chapters.

      Thanks for stopping by, rabigale.

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      Reply
  1. Robin Helm

    You need confirmation that there is, indeed, another noteworthy film adaptation of Persuasion? Though I love the Root/Hinds version, there is also much to like about the 2007 TV film starring Hawkins and Penry-Jones.

    That being said, Amanda Root is my favorite Anne.

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    1. Susan Kaye Post author

      I wanted to like the 2007 version. I even preordered the DVD before it played on PBS here in the US. When I invest money in something, you know I mean business.

      I watched on TV, then I watched the disk a few times. Rather than go into all the things I don’t like about it, I will say I liked the cinematography. I gave the disk away to a reader of the blog.

      I don’t begrudge anyone their enjoyment of the Hawkins/Penry-Jones version, I’m just not one of you. There is still just one adaptation here in the Sueverse.

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      1. Robin Helm

        The 2007 version is not as close to the original plot as is the older version. I can understand your problems with it. I don’t care for the characterization of Anne either, but I like Penry-Jones. What can I say? I’m shallow. I like a handsome face. Ha!

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        1. Susan Kaye Post author

          We all like a “pretty face”, the question is whether the face is considered pretty to anyone else. Penry-Jones is handsome to be sure, but he’s not the style of man I go for. And since I didn’t like the writer’s tack in the adaptation, I got rid of the version. I find, as I get older, I will watch a movie for pretty scenery, but when the characterization or plot are not to my liking, I’m more willing to clean or walk the dog.

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    2. rabiagale

      I’ve seen both adaptations, and I have reservations about each. If I had to pick one, I’d go with the earlier one, in spite of Amanda Root’s occasional deer-in-the-headlights look. The characterization in the more recent movie was just too off for me.

      My thought is that Anne Eliot is a hard character to portray. She’s not a kind of heroine we see much of in our modern entertainment.

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      1. Susan Kaye Post author

        I try to give the benefit of the doubt to adaptations. All the creative layers that the story sluices through give all sorts of shades and layers that may or may not please me, the reader. That being said, the 2007 version was too harsh. I get it, Frederick is angry. But, he’s clever and witty. He can be in Anne’s presence without staring daggers through her.

        I agree about Anne. She seems to be the anti ChickLit kind of gal so admired these days. She’s the one I want in a crisis. Not that she did all that much when Louisa swan dived off the Cobb. She held up her sister and Henrietta, and passed off the salts to Charles, but hey, she did know that Benwick was the better one to go for a surgeon.

        On message boards I’ve seen people say they would want Anne as a friend. She’d be a toughie, I think. She’d be loyal as all get out, but for a woman who makes so much about how good it is to have an open character, she doesn’t really seem to have one.

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          1. Susan Kaye Post author

            No, her family is a lost cause. And Lady Russell is as well. Anne does little more than listen the entire time she’s at Uppercross cottage. When she arrives at Bath, she does talk to William Elliot about good conversation, but we know her opinion of him is guarded at best and quickly solidifies against him. She talks to Frederick each time she is with him. Finally. Though they did do the polite, “weather and the roads” when they were socially together in Somerset. She doesn’t even really talk to Mrs. Smith until Smith pushes her with teasing about Anne marrying Mr. Elliot.

            I’m not saying that Anne’s care in sharing is bad. She’s learned that too much talk gets her in trouble. And, can open her up to changing her mind. (I imagine that last conversation of any length she had was with Lady Russell about Frederick and we know how that went.)

            Anne is an observer and so keeps the choicest bits to herself. I think the longer she and FW are married, the more talkative she will become.

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Why yes, we DO want a piece of your mind. ;-)

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