Wentworth Wednesday

I’m going through Persuasion chapter-by-chapter, citing favorite texts.

Chapter 4:
He was, at that time, a remarkably fine young man, with a great deal of intelligence, spirit, and brilliancy; and Anne an extremely pretty girl, with gentleness, modesty, taste, and feeling. Half the sum of attraction, on either side, might have been enough, for he had nothing to do, and she had hardly anybody to love; but the encounter of such lavish recommendations could not fail. Half the sum of attraction, on either side, might have been enough, for he had nothing to do, and she had hardly anybody to love; but the encounter of such lavish recommendations could not fail. They were gradually acquainted, and when acquainted, rapidly and deeply in love. It would be difficult to say which had seen highest perfection in the other, or which had been the happiest: she, in receiving his declarations and proposals, or he in having them accepted.

A short period of exquisite felicity followed, and but a short one. Troubles soon arose. Sir Walter, on being applied to, without actually withholding his consent, or saying it should never be, gave it all the negative of great astonishment, great coldness, great silence, and a professed resolution of doing nothing for his daughter. He thought it a very degrading alliance; and Lady Russell, though with more tempered and pardonable pride, received it as a most unfortunate one.

He thought it a very degrading alliance ...

He thought it a very degrading alliance …

Anne Elliot, with all her claims of birth, beauty, and mind, to throw herself away at nineteen; involve herself at nineteen in an engagement with a young man, who had nothing but himself to recommend him, and no hopes of attaining affluence, but in the chances of a most uncertain profession, and no connexions to secure even his farther rise in the profession, would be, indeed, a throwing away, which she grieved to think of! Anne Elliot, so young; known to so few, to be snatched off by a stranger without alliance or fortune; or rather sunk by him into a state of most wearing, anxious, youth-killing dependence! It must not be, if by any fair interference of friendship, any representations from one who had almost a mother’s love, and mother’s rights, it would be prevented.

Captain Wentworth had no fortune. He had been lucky in his profession; but spending freely, what had come freely, had realized nothing. But he was confident that he should soon be rich: full of life and ardour, he knew that he should soon have a ship, and soon be on a station that would lead to everything he wanted. He had always been lucky; he knew he should be so still. Such confidence, powerful in its own warmth, and bewitching in the wit which often expressed it, must have been enough for Anne; but Lady Russell saw it very differently. His sanguine temper, and fearlessness of mind, operated very differently on her. She saw in it but an aggravation of the evil. It only added a dangerous character to himself. He was brilliant, he was headstrong. Lady Russell had little taste for wit, and of anything approaching to imprudence a horror. She deprecated the connexion in every light.

She saw in it but an aggravation of the evil

She saw in it but an aggravation of the evil

Such opposition, as these feelings produced, was more than Anne could combat. Young and gentle as she was, it might yet have been possible to withstand her father’s ill-will, though unsoftened by one kind word or look on the part of her sister; but Lady Russell, whom she had always loved and relied on, could not, with such steadiness of opinion, and such tenderness of manner, be continually advising her in vain. She was persuaded to believe the engagement a wrong thing: indiscreet, improper, hardly capable of success, and not deserving it. But it was not a merely selfish caution, under which she acted, in putting an end to it. Had she not imagined herself consulting his good, even more than her own, she could hardly have given him up. The belief of being prudent, and self-denying, principally for his advantage, was her chief consolation, under the misery of a parting, a final parting; and every consolation was required, for she had to encounter all the additional pain of opinions, on his side, totally unconvinced and unbending, and of his feeling himself ill used by so forced a relinquishment. He had left the country in consequence.

A few months had seen the beginning and the end of their acquaintance; but not with a few months ended Anne’s share of suffering from it. Her attachment and regrets had, for a long time, clouded every enjoyment of youth, and an early loss of bloom and spirits had been their lasting effect.

“…for he had nothing to do, and she had hardly anybody to love; … ” This is one of the most heart-breaking lines in literature, in my opinion. It reads as boredom begets love. Or, if the season for shooting was on Frederick might not have fallen in love with Anne. Or, it could be seen as a fortuitous thing that a young man who might not have noticed the quiet Anne Elliot is forced to look a little harder and see what others don’t.

Years ago a reader suggested that I go back to this part of Persuasion and write about Frederick and Anne’s first encounter and the subsequent break-up. I mumbled something about other stuff to do, but the truth is that I am in awe of the way Austen took less than eight hundred words so elegantly and deeply summed up the beginning and the end of their love affair. Sometimes fan fiction is great for going into the minutia of the canon and elaborating on each of the character’s feelings. Other times I think it’s best to leave the original alone. Especially when you haven’t the talent or the heart to improve on it.

5 thoughts on “Wentworth Wednesday

    1. Susan Kaye Post author

      But it would be so bloody sad! Thanks for the vote of confidence that I could take the sow’s ear of young lovers parted by foolishness and fear, and make it into a facsimile of a silk purse.

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      Reply
  1. Laura Hile

    Love the movie stills you chose. Sir Walter looking truly grieved, imagine that.

    And the one with Lady Russell conversing politely while Anne remains silent says so much. Anne still has “hardly anybody to love” if the most sympathetic person in her life is Lady Russell.

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    Reply

Why yes, we DO want a piece of your mind. ;-)

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