Mama’s storyteller

MotherLaura’s post about her story telling roots brought up pleasant memories for me. My second grade teacher noticed my knack for story-telling and often put me in front of the room with the instructions, “Tell us a story, Robin.” That was it. No suggestions. No prompts. And so I did, spinning the story from my imagination.

Things just came to me. I’d remember something that had happened, and I’d weave a story from it. I always loved reading, writing, and telling stories, and I’ve not lost my joy for any of those three activities.

My mother was my cheerleader. She wrote her entire life down in journals. My sisters have stacks of them. She encouraged my love of storytelling, and I truly regret that I did not publish a book before she died. She would have thoroughly enjoyed it.

I’ve read that the number one fear of Americans is public speaking. That fear is before death or illness. For me, public speaking is an easy thing.

I fear heights above anything else. I don’t like to drive over high bridges, and I will drive miles out of the way to avoid it.

What do you fear?

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About Robin Helm

Robin Helm has published all three volumes of The Guardian Trilogy: Guardian, SoulFire, and Legacy. She also recently published the Yours by Design Series: Accidentally Yours, Sincerely Yours, and Forever Yours. She and her husband have two adult daughters, two sons-in-law, two granddaughters, and a Yorkie Poo named Toby.

13 thoughts on “Mama’s storyteller

  1. Laura Hile

    I share my fellow Americans’ fear of speaking–to adults. Funny, I know where I am with teens and younger. The line of demarcation is clear. With adults I feel as if i need to earn their attention because I’m an expert.

    Teaching a fiction writing class to my own age group would be daunting. Until, of course, I uncapped the dry erase marker and started talking. Familiarity would take over once I began writing on the whiteboard…I hope!

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      1. Laura Hile

        But I don’t have anything to say that hasn’t been said before!🙂

        What I do in my high school classes is give students permission to entertain one another. “This class is as good as you make it,” I tell them. “Make us laugh, string us along with nail-biting tension, make us cry.” Turns out this is empowering. They don’t disappoint!

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  2. Susan Kaye

    I’m always puzzled by the public-speaking fear. I will quake in my boots if I leave a comment on a FB post that might invite a rant by someone, but tell me to talk in front of people. Pffff, no problem. In junior high I put off writing and practicing what was supposed to be an instructional talk. As I was walking into the room, I decided what to do. I asked for three sheets of news print and a pair of sissors. I yakked my way through demonstrating how you make a paper palm tree. I got an A. One of my few. I also had a tendency to put off writing book reports until the last minute, then making them up and handing them in.

    I should be a politician.

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    1. Robin Helm Post author

      You’re too honest to be a politician, but I would love to see you write and publish more books. I love your writing, and there’s too little of it available. Writing is like public speaking. No fear.

      Liked by 1 person

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      1. Susan Kaye

        Oh Robin, you don’t know me very well. I watch political dramas and think, but for the grace of God, there go I. I can rationalize practically anything. My family hears me say all the time that they should thanks God I came to belief in Christ because I could make their lives a misery and rationalize it to be the best for us all.

        As for the writing–or the acceptable lies I tell–I keep doing but nothing comes past 30k words. Time to rethink novels.

        Thanks for commenting.

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply

Why yes, we DO want a piece of your mind. ;-)

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