Tag Archives: Pride and Prejudice

Darcy, Christmas, and first love… What could be better? A sale!

Young Master Darcy – Pamela Aidan

Are you looking for a lovely holiday gift for a Jane Austen fan?

The Kindle and print editions of Pamela Aidan’s charming novella, Young Master Darcy: A Lesson in Honour, now have special Christmas prices.

Kindle eBook: $4.99
Print book: $8.50

UPDATE: Simon & Schuster has reduced the price of the three-eBook set, Fitzwilliam Darcy, Gentleman.

 

Check your favorite online bookstore!

Images are links to Amazon.

Book Description: It is Christmas, 1797, and thirteen year-old Master Fitzwilliam Darcy returns home from his first term at Eton in full anticipation of the holidays. Soon, he and his family will leave their fashionable London home for Pemberley, their Derbyshire estate, to prepare for the arrival of his irrepressible cousin Richard and the rest of his Matlock relations. But when Darcy arrives in London, he learns that his mother is ill. Her doctor’s prognosis is dire–Lady Anne cannot survive another year!

As Christmas approaches, Darcy is torn between his parents’ struggles to carry on and the attraction of an unusual company of players in Lambton for the holidays. With the arrival of Richard and his family, he must try to satisfy the expectations of all and, in doing so, learn what it means to be a Darcy.

Pamela Aidan has created a touching coming-of-age novella based on characters from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. A Lesson In Honour explores love, duty, and family honour.

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No Darcy, No Way

Darcy is Best Left to Others

Someone said to me that I should write some Pride and Prejudice fan fiction. In the past, it’s been suggested I write Colonel Brandon. My first response to both suggestions was a simple, “no way.”

While that response is harsh but accurate, I have thought about why I don’t want to even try my hand at writing Darcy or the Colonel. It comes down to having nothing new or interesting to say about the characters or their stories.

Refrain_from_writingThere are days I look at what I’m writing about Anne and Frederick and think the same thing, but at least I have a sort of visceral desire to work with them. About the casts of P&P and S&S, not so much.

Every month in the Austen fandom, there are scads of books published. The vast majority of them are using P&P as their base. I’m sure most are retelling the girl-meets-boy-boy-disdains-girl-boy-proposes-marriage-girl-rejects-boy-boy-saves-girl’s-family-and-reputation-girl-and-boy-admit-to-loving-one-another plot.

Unique stories, like Laura Hile’s Darcy by any Other Name, and Robin Helm’s various series have covered a lot of new ground that doesn’t need to be plowed again by me. There are other fine writers who absolutely love the characters and the story. That affection shows in every aspect of their writing.

At the very best, I would be day laborer working for paycheck. Not that writing for pay is bad. I firmly believe that some of the best writing (and music, visual art, etc) has been done by people putting food on the table, not looking to leave a legacy of amazing prose. The difference is that in fandom, the love of characters is baked into the foundation of the work. Without it, the foundation is wonky at best. And let’s face it, there have been times you’ve read a book that is merely a word count with a cover and a dedication. Did you think well of the author? Race to Amazon to see if they had more of the same? My point exactly.

Darcy is an icon and I have no desire to mess with him. Brandon is an interesting character I prefer to read rather than write. Long story shortened, I won’t be writing any P&P, or S&S fics anytime soon. No heart for the subjects, and no desire to bore you all to tears.

A Little Something after all these years…

 

Dy Brougham Searches for Lt.Richard Fitzwilliam
Pamela Aidan

(1815, 2 years or so after Darcy & Elizabeth are wed)

The wagon jolted and shivered over the shell pocked roads until Dy’s teeth ached and his fingers cramped in their grip on its splintery sides. Rain continued to fall in unrepentant bursts that were soaking through his oiled cape. His hat was most likely a loss, even for its protective coverings, and the cold crept into the reaches of muscle and bone, both thoroughly wracked by the paths he had been required to travel to get to the farm house in which Darcy’s cousin was said to have been deposited before Uxbridge moved out.

“Il ya la ferme de Emille. Nous sommes presque hors de la pluie damnés,” his driver tossed over his shoulder. (There is Emille’s farm. We’re almost out of the damned rain.”) Continue reading

Problems With Pride and Prejudice?

Like Mary Poppins, Jane Austen novels are practically perfect in every way.

PD_JamesAnd so is one of my favorite authors, P. D. James, creator of the Adam Dalgleish mysteries. Though, she sees problems.

From the Huffington Post: Apart from describing the life at Pemberley and the process of the investigation, I have dealt with what I feel are two problems in Pride and Prejudice.

Firstly, the extraordinarily ungallant and unacceptable words in which Darcy first proposed to Elizabeth, and secondly, why he took from school Georgiana, his fifteen year old sister, nervous and recently bereaved of her mother, and placed her in the sole care of the abominable Mrs Younge.

Jane Austen may have made all this plain in the original draft of the novel, but it was sixteen years before the revised version was published in 1813.

What do you think? Serious problems or just little threads not tied?

Take care–Susan Kaye

200 Years Ago Today

LizziePride and Prejudice was released. Ans we are all better for it.

You can go anywhere in the Austenverse and find blog posts about Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice and this auspicious anniversary. The whole magilla is out there for your perusal.

Here’s our little contribution: What is your favorite P&P moment? It can be from the Canon, it can be any one of what seem to be thousands of adaptation, it can come from what seem to be millions of fan fics, prequels, sequels, parallels, mash-ups or stories with only a tenuous hold on P&P.

I’ll go first. My favorite moment in Pride and Prejudice is in the 1995 version when all the hullabaloo is happening with Charles Bingley’s return to Longborne. Mrs. Bennett is pushing and pulling Jane to sit up, slouch, etc.  Kitty adds that someone is with him. “…that tall proud one.” The look that comes over Jennifer Ehle’s face is perfect. The realization that Lizzie has reason to hope is sweet and subtle.

So, what’s your favorite moment? It’s a free-for-all so go to it.

Take care–Susan Kaye

Readin’ and Writin’ at the Festival

If you can get to the Decatur Book Festival Robin, Gayle and I would love to meet you! We’ll be in the JASNA tents, #101-103.

Reading from my books: Saturday at 2:45/Sunday between 1:45 –  2. Writing my name in books and talking Austen: Saturday 11:15 – 12:30, 3:00 – 5:20/
Sunday 12 – 1, 2 – 4

Robin will be reading both from her books and from Laura’s : Saturday 11-11:15/Sunday 3:30 – 3:45. She’ll be autographing on Saturday 12:30 – 1:45, 3 – 5:20/Sunday 120-01, 2 – 5.

Decatur Bound!

It’s less than a week until the Decatur Book Festival near my former home of Atlanta, Georgia. The festival sounds wonderfully exciting, and the good people of the Jane Austen Society of North America-Georgia chapter have gone to extraordinary lengths to bring Jane to the Festival. The even attracts 100,000 annually and, although not all are Austen lovers, I imagine that more readers will be exposed to Austen and her literary progeny at one time than ever before.

A book festival–what a wonderful thing in a time when “story” is making another leap in form, spreading further into lives as ebooks living in “clouds”! Whatever would Jane think? Even fifteen years ago when I first started writing An Assembly Such as This, such a thing was not on my horizon. I thought I was quite up on technology by writing by computer rather than with pen and paper, composing by the soft click of the keyboard rather than the explosive bang of the typewriter. So now the dream is to appear in e-ink and be drawn down from a cloud into people’s lives via such strange sounding devices as Nooks and Kindles that will read to you as well, rather than enshrined in bound paper packages.

What will be next? Book glasses, I suppose. Text will stream across the lenses and a tiny microphone will chirp the text to you in surround-sound realism, complete with a musical score. And Jane will make that leap as well: deftly , gracefully, compellingly. Technology nor shifting public taste will hinder her advance through cultures because she writes of the human heart in all its “follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies” that lead it into joy and sorrow in every culture, in every time. Although we are not early 19th century ladies and gentleman, we can still recognize ourselves and our neighbors in her words and, perhaps, understand and profit from that recognition to become the gracious ladies and gentlemen of our own times.

Hope to see you in Decatur!

Pamela

PS There’s a list of all the Austen authors at the festival and a give away contest  of An Assembly Such as This and Young Master Darcy at Darcyholicsdiversions.com. Scurry on over!